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Full text of "Southwestern Ontario For Your Canadian Vacation 1948"

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ONTARIO 


Stretching half way across the continent, and with an 
area of more than 412,000 square miles, the Province of 
Ontario offers a diversity of year-round attractions which 
have won For it the title ‘ Canada's Vacation Province. " 
Within Ms boundaries are to be found so many Features of 
entertainment, sport and pure relaxation that it is difficult 
to enumerate them without the details being lost in the 
tremendous over-all picture. For this reason we have 
prepared Five regional booklets, each describing the out- 
standing characteristics of one geographic district within 
the Province, 

This booklet deals with Southwestern Ontario, roughly 
that area lying between Lake Erie on the south and Georgian 
Bay on the north; Lake Huron on the west, and on the east 
a line drawn across country from Oakville on Lake On- 
tario, to Southampton on Lake Huron, 

The other units in Ontario's vacation picture are South- 
eastern Ontario, Central Ontario, Northern Ontario and 
Northwestern Ontario* Copies of these publications ore 
also yours for the asking. 


DEPARTMENT OF TRAVEL AND PUBLICITY 

Parliament Building*, Taranto £, Ontario 

HON f ARTHUR WHL5H, 0-5.G. r MlnFiter TOM C McCALL. Depuiy Mjniiifif 



JarnQ. 

B&y 


SAULT BTE.fAAPU 


Montreal 


PAUL 


TORONTO 


Lake Onfa r 


BUFFALO 


CHICAGO 


DETROIT 


PHILADELPHIA 


NEW YORK 



THE EASTERN GATE 
IS LOVELY NIAGARA 


Niagara in all its glory 


Maid of the Mist braves the rapids 


The Stocks at Fort George 



From the early 17th Century, 
through French, Indian and Ameri- 
can wars, the Niagara Peninsula 
has been a stage for the enact- 
ment of Canadian history. To- 
day friendly citizens of once war- 
ring nations explore together the 
glory of the great cataract, the 
miles of parks, the gracious Oakes 
Garden Theatre, the restored 
forts of another age. Every mo- 
ment of the day there is something 
exciting to do — and season-long 
the Niagara Peninsula is a veri- 
table bower, where blossoms 
burst in all their glory in May, 
roses bloom in profusion in June, 
and the luscious fruit hangs on 
the trees in summer and tempts the 
motorist to the wayside stand 
when the harvest season rolls 
around. 

Bisecting the Peninsula is the 
great Welland Canal, with pass- 
ing ships of the Great Lakes fleets, 
while the modern Queen Eliza- 
beth Way provides easy access to 
St. Catharines, and Hamilton, one 
of Ontario’s greatest cities, and 
doorway to all of Central 
Ontario. 


Hamilton's shopping district 


Maid of the Mist braves the rapids 


J: 

min 



Pi 

mm 




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5 Brock Monument, Oueenston Heights 


Fort Erie restored 






Typical Lake Erie farm Ambassador Bridge, Windsor-Detroit ^ 


Golf course, Leamington 


Windsor from the air 


Those who enter Ontario at Windsor 
find themselves at the doorway to Essex 
and Kent Counties/ "The Sunparlour of 
Canada," the most southerly point in 
the Dominion, where balmy air and 
bright sunny days set the seasons a full 
fortnight ahead. Excellent highways 


traverse the area and skirt the scenic 
shores of Lake Erie. Historical ly there 
are many and diversified attractions — 
old Fort Malden at Amherstburg, relic of 
the War of 1812 . John Brown’s house 
at Chatham, northern terminal of the 
Underground Railway/ and Uncle Tom's 


6 




Sailing on Detroit River 


Pelee Island pheasants 


Fort Malden at 
Amherstburg 


A Deer in 
Rondeau Park 

T7T 


grave at Dresden, recalling Harriet 
Beecher Stowe’s "Uncle Tom’s Cabin." 

To round out the vacation picture, 
Point Pelee National Park and beautiful 
Rondeau Provincial Park provide ideal 
outdoor life and camping on the very 
doorstep of urban Ontario. Jack Miner’s 


Bird Sanctuary at Kingsville will enthrall 
the nature-lover; and Lake Erie’s shores 
call to the fisherman, for this is the water 
where bass is king! Here in Ontario's 
Sunparlour, the vacationist will find 
everything to fulfil the wishes of the 
whole family who are holiday bound. 


7 


4 





Fishing fleet In port 


Boy 


Point 


tong 


The 

SUNNY 

shores 

of 

LAKE ERIE 


* 

I 


County 


Just resting! 


Dove: 


port 


Beoch 




r r i F r |e on *0 eost, 

• , Pa lee on the *«' I° v ocoUon P 'e°^° 
from Point Prie is a v ,i> s |op* n °' c k 

the nor* s '' or ® ° one m oV enjoy ,he J deUg httuj, sandy 
ground. '"'e m i|e upon on d 30-n"' e 

bass fishing, '°' 1 Houghton Sand H At St. 

Keach, e*p'° r . . >i wa y across Uo forestry 

Long Point, jotting h AmerlwJ O^ ^ County, 

*«- j sis <° *• ria £? home ° 

Farms, ond Vlr8 | n io o' Cono 

\ n quaint tin' 0 from the w/ . ; » em ent and 

qoie' ho'' d ^ h °; e a 7 Beoch, find a" highly* 

Stanley ond i O* , co lony. t r ovlde ready 

■~ri? *» "ii- «* ’*'• 









Air view of the City of London 


OLD WORLD . . . 

. . . AND NEW 


In the heart of Southwestern Ontario, 
only a few miles from the U. S. border, 
is a landscape as English as Eton. Half 
a dozen Canadian cities, established by 
hardy British settlers, carry on the tradi- 
tions of the old land, — repeating in 
name and appearance, the home scenes 
of the early pioneers. Most notable 
among them, the Canadian London was 


founded in 1793 by Lieutenan 1- 
Governor John Graves Simcoe, who 
planned that his new city would one 
day be capital of Upper Canada. 
Here are nostalgic memories of Black- 
friars, Vauxhall, Piccadilly and Covent 
Garden Market; of St. Paul's Cathedral 
and Cheapside and Pall Mall; and a 
second River Thames flows graciously 


Springbank Park, London 


Whore Tecumsoh fell, near Chatham 


through its beautiful valley, and past the 
dignified buildings of the University of 
Western Ontario. 

Neighbouring towns such as Stratford 
(on the Avon River), St. Thomas and 
Woodstock carry out the theme, and 
throughout the surrounding countryside, 
the fields are rolling, rich and green, in 
true English tradition. 


London may be reached by paved 
highways from Windsor, Sarnia, Buffalo, 
and Hamilton; while equally excellent 
roads provide easy access to the beauti- 
ful beaches of Lake Erie and Lake Huron. 

Near the City of St. Thomas, are 
several important historic sites, notably 
the historic Soufhwold Earthworks, and 
the Talbot Estate. 


Ontario dairy herds are famous 


Alma College, St. Thomas 


Uncle Tom’s Grave, Dresden 







Rock formation, Kettle Point 


dinner 


preparing 


The Blue Water 
Highway Leads North 


and sunning 


Good swimming! 


looking out over blue Lake Huron. 

Anglers will find excellent fishing in 
the deep waters of Lake Huron itself, 
or in the numerous inland streams which 
empty into it. 

Beyond Southampton, at the northern 
end of the Blue Water Highway, King's 
Highway Number 6 branches off to the 
beautiful Bruce Peninsula, leading north- 
ward to Tobermory and the Manitoulin 
Island ferrv. King’s Highway Number 
21 continues eastward to Owen Sound, 
where, again, lake boats connect with 
Manitoulin, or the motorist may go on to 
the lovely Georgian Bay country, 
Huronia, Lake Simcoe and Muskoka. 


From Sarnia to Southampton, the Blue 
Water Highway, (King's Highway 
Number 21) skirts the shores of Lake 
Huron, providing a scenic route to all 
of central and northern Ontario. At 
every turn of the road lie new oppor- 
tunities for vacation fun. From the 
amazing stone formations and fossils at 
Kettle Point, just out of Sarnia, through 
the Pinery and the lovely beaches 
around Ipperwash Park, the road leads 
on to Grand Bend, phenomenal summer 
colony whose summer population is more 
than ten times the normal figure for the 
town. At Goderich, Inverhuron and 
Port Elgin there are many beach resorts, 


take Huron 


Bayfield 


12 


13 







OF THE GRAND RIVER 


AND THE VALLEY 


Bowling on the green 

1 


Church of the Mohawks 


fie I! Memorial, Brantford 


The Glen at El ora 


Bel! Homestead wher^ne telephone was Invented 


First Schoofhouse in Waterloo, 1 820 


Richly endowed by bo I h history and nature, this magnificent 
valley extending from Port Maitland on Lake Erie, to Georgian 
Bay, once marked the preferred canoe route of the Six Nations 
Indians. In colonial days it was famous for its gigantic trees, 
which early settlers felled and shipped abroad to make masts 
for the great sailing vessels of the time. To-day the many 
industrial communities which grew up, as a result of the river 
facilities, are hidden among the leaves and hedgerows/ and 


Paris, Galt, Kitchener and Guelph, are as famed for their 
beauty as their Indust ry. 

The area is ideal for hiking, bicycling or motoring, with 
something new to b© seen every minute, ranging from the house 
where Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone to the 
Church of the Mohawks on the Indian Reserve near Brant- 
ford; from the beautiful and wild Glen of El ora to magnificent 
man-made Belwood Lake, first step In a gigantic conservation 
scheme to restore this charming valley to its original beauty. 


You'll be Interested to Know — 


Canadian Gnitanui Regulations cute Simple 

Be Sure to Bring With You Your State License Card 

Tourists entering Carada do not require passports. It is sug- 
gested, however, that the possession of identification papers will 
facilitate entry into Canada and also assist in establishing the 
visitor’s right to re-enter his own country on his return there. 

Automobiles imported by non-residents for touring purposes only 
are admitted for a period of up to six months. These permits are 
obtainable from Customs Officers at port of entry. 

Articles comprising a tourist s outfit may be brought into Canada 
without duty or deposit. 


you. May Shop, in &*itcuua 

United States Customs Regulations 

Residents of the United States, returning from Ontario, are en- 
titled to exemption from duty on articles up to the value of $100.00, 
acquired in Canada, if such resident has remained outside the 
territorial limits of the United States for at least 48 hours on the 
trip on which merchandise was acquired and have not applied for 
a similar exemption within the previous thirty days. 

Each member of the family in the party is entitled to the exemption 
of $100.00 and when a husband and wife and minor or dependent 
children are travelling together, the articles included within such 
exemption may be grouped and allowance made without regard to 
whicn member of the party they belong. 


Ontario Offers Excellent Fishing 

A non-resident fishing license in Ontario costs $5.50 per person; 
or a family license covering parents and children 
For complete fishing information, write for copy of THE FISHER- 
MAN’S ONTARIO. 

The Canadian Gallon is Equal to Five U.S. Quarts 


16 


DEPARTMENT OF TRAVEL AND PUBLICITY 
Parliament Buildings, Toronto 2, Ontario 


Honourable Arthur Welsh, D.S.O., Minister 
Tom C. McCall, Deputy Minister 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Other publications of this Department, available on request: 
ONTARIO, YOUR BEST VACATION BET 
THE FISHERMAN’S ONTARIO 
WATERWAYS TO EXPLORE— BOOK I, THE TRENT 
WATERWAYS TO EXPLORE-BOOK II, THE RIDEAU LAKES 
1947 ONTARIO ROAD MAP 
FLYING FACTS ABOUT ONTARIO 
1947 WITH ROD AND GUN IN ONTARIO 
WHERE TO STAY IN ONTARIO 


♦ ♦ ♦ 

For your convenience, the Government of the Province of Ontario 
operates Tourist Reception Centres at main border-crossing points. 

You will find uniformed receptionists on hand to answer any last 
minute queries you may have, and to help you map your route 


through Ontario. These centres are located at: 

Fort Frances Church Street 

Kenora-Keewatin Cameron Bay Bridge 

Pigeon River Near Fort William-Port Arthur 

Windsor Detroit-Windsor Tunnel 

Windsor Ambassador Bridge 

Niagara Falls Whirlpool Rapids Bridge 

Poirt Edward near Sarnia Blue Water Bridge 

St. Catharines Junction Queen Elizabeth Way and Highway Number 8 

Fort Erie Peace Bridge Exit 

Sault Ste. Marie Ferry Dock 

Prescott.. Ferry Dock 

Lansdowne 1000-Islands Bridge Exit 


PRINTED IN CANADA 



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